Technology Makes Fashion in Japan More Convenient

A Busy Life no Longer an Excuse to Ignore the Latest Fashion Trends

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Japan is known the world over as a fashion-conscious country. Unique and unafraid to try new trends, the Japanese like to keep their fingers on the fashion pulse at all times. However, with hectic work schedules and home-life responsibilities, it’s not always easy to carve out time for keeping up with the latest trends.

But, the Japanese fashion follower is in good hands because entrepreneurs like Shintaro Yamada, Tsubasa Koseki and Satoshi Amanuma decided to fill the gaps in the market to ensure people had access to fashion that is convenient, and for all budgets.

Mercari

With the rising trend in Japan of people opting to buy second-hand goods instead of new products, flea-market site, Mercari, provides the perfect platform to satisfy this development. For fashion enthusiasts it’s the ideal place to sell off unwanted clothing and pick up a bargain that you’ll love, at a fraction of the cost of a new one.

As an auction site, it allows users to buy, post and sell items online. However, the difference between Mercari and other auction platforms, like eBay and Yahoo Japan, is that users can do all their transactions using their smartphones. This makes it so much more accessible and easier to use, thus broadening the user-base and the interaction on the site.

Mercari has seen steady growth since its launch in 2013 and is currently in the IPO process with a market value of ¥406 billion. Its founder, Shintaro Yamada, is set to become a billionaire after the stock begins trading later this month.

it’s not always easy to carve out time for keeping up with trends

Facy

Facy is a fashion app that allows people to buy clothes and get style advice from professionals. How the app works is it connects fashion stores directly with their customers.

Facy users can post a question, like “what shoes would go with a floral dress?”, and then the stores can answer the question with shoe selections from their range or with advice from their in-store stylists. If the customer likes the products they are shown, they can then buy the item(s) or reserve them.

Facy addresses the issue many of its users have which is that they don’t have time to shop with their busy schedules. With the app, they can keep up with fashion trends in their own time.

And, as stores can communicate directly with their customers, this allows them to better understand, and cater to, their customers’ needs. Providing essential market research as well as increasing sales. Everyone’s a winner.

 

AirCloset

For those who don’t have the time to spend wandering around the stores trying to pick out the perfect clothing items for you, AirCloset is the answer.

AirCloset is a personal styling fashion subscription where a professional stylist will select clothing items for you and send them to you home. People can choose a monthly plan whereby they can rent the fashion items for as much time as they want.

Depending on the plan you choose you can rent one specially-selected outfit or unlimited outfits. When you receive your clothing, you can then message your stylist to give your opinion on the selection. That way, they can make the best choices for you in future. And, if you find an item or outfit that you love, you have the option to buy it.

So, even with a busy schedule and a tight budget, you can still keep up with the latest fashion in Japan thanks to the tech-savvy entrepreneurs behind the enterprises we featured above.

Today’s “otsumami” – a bite size snack:

Technology will always find a way to make life easier – be it work, education or fashion … tech’s got you covered!

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Written by Catherine McGuinness

Writer and Journalist with a love for all things Japan.

Up/Down VoterContent AuthorVerified UserStory MakerYears Of MembershipEmoji Addict

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